Passion. Perspective. Purpose.

 

Passion. Perspective. Purpose.

A Summer Blog Series
Ghost Written by Hannah Rials

9th Summer Blog Post:
My Perspective: If Hallowed Halls Could Speak
It’s a beautiful day, not a cloud in the sky. The wind is whistling in the branches of my trees, and the sun is shining down on my blooming flowers. There’s a child walking up my stone path, looking up at me with big, wet eyes. A woman stands behind her, a hand on her shoulder, and urges her up to my front door. I feel her tremors through the boards in my floor. They resonate in the walls.

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8th Summer Blog Post:
Christina Copland: An Open Forensic Interviewer

The most important fact about New Hope, and there’s no disputing this, we are always open—physically, mentally, and emotionally. Our doors are open twenty-four hours a day, seven days a week, 365 days a year. Our ears are open to hearing the truths, problems, needs, and fears of all the children who walk through our doors. Our minds are open to new methods and research based practices to better serve our clients, team, and community. We share openly our knowledge of how to keep children safe so we can prevent future abuse from occurring.  We’re working toward a future where we don’t have to be open anymore. 

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7th Summer Blog Post:
Raeann Bray Reihl: A Healing Family Advocate

New Hope is just a healing place. There’s no other way to describe it. Our job is to heal children to heal families, and in turn our community. But as a team, we end up healing each other as well. I mean, how amazing is that? Hello, everyone! I’m Raeann; many of you probably know me from my just flitting around the office. I’m the Family advocate around here, but I guess I should tell you how I got to where I am today.

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6th Summer Blog Post:

The Playroom: A New Place to Wait

The New Hope playroom is a bright, friendly place for children to play and begin to adjust before they begin to go through our system. Over the last 13 years, more than 5,000 children have entered New Hope and began their journey of healing by spending time in this very room. Our many thanks to all of those who painted, donated toys and books, and have volunteered their time to play or sit with the children who come here for services.

Click here to continue reading about the up-dated playroom and to see pictures.

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5th Summer Blog Post:

Ken Cooper: A Humble Board Member

This work is just so humbling. I get to hear the staff’s stories of the good work that they do, and it’s humbling to be around people that do this for our community. The work certainly puts life into perspective. This place, it’s a place of rescue—in all senses of the word. These kids are in horrible situations without hope. But these wonderful people, they get them out, give them therapy that allows them to get past the trauma. New Hope does a full rescue—the wounds they’re healing, you can’t fix with a Band-Aid. I can’t think of anything more important.

Click here to continue reading Ken’s perspective.

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4th Summer Blog Post:

Stephanie Shults: A Healing Medical Examiner

Despite all the hurdles that New Hope faces, whether they are monetary, social, or justice, they are still able to help these kids move on, heal, have a full life, and trust people again. I’ve never been a part of such a healing place. And I’m a doctor.

Many of you probably have not met me; I do the work behind closed doors. My name is Dr. Stephanie Schultz. I’ve been a pediatrician for 21 years now, and I own my own private practice in Knoxville. Being a resident of Blount County, I was familiar with New Hope. Five years ago, I realized that I could help with the service that I already provide for people. I trained with a forensic pediatrician for a year so that I can volunteer and provide forensic medical exams for victims of abuse at New Hope.

Click here to continue reading Stephanie’s perspective.

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 3rd Summer Blog Post:

Angela Dykes: An Exceptional Parent

New Hope is just exceptional—every employee, aspect, goal, fundraising event. They are completely kid-oriented, helpful, and non-judgmental, which is huge. I’ve never felt uncomfortable here. Once both of my girls are in school, I plan on coming back to volunteer and donate in any way I can. This exceptional organization deserves everything back that they have given me and my girls.
Hello, my name is Angela Dykes. I’m not a staff member, or board member, or volunteer. I’m a grandparent. I pulled my two granddaughters from drug exposure, and now I’ve adopted them. They’re my kids now. And I couldn’t have done it without the love and support of the New Hope staff.

Click here to continue reading Angela’s perspective.

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2nd Summer Blog Post: 

Mary Steger: A Compassionate Volunteer

New Hope is one of those places that shouldn’t have to exist. But it does because, in our society, we need a caring place like this. New Hope has changed my life. There’s no ifs, ands, or buts about it. And, it seems, so many people just don’t know…

Mary Steger here. I’ve been a volunteer at New Hope for about three years now. I was raised outside of Nashville and migrated to this side of the state when I earned my bachelors degree at Maryville College, where I eventually formed a few connections with some of the wonderful people at New Hope. Right out of school, I went on to work at Mountain Challenge, Maryville College’s outdoor program, and thoroughly enjoyed my time there. This is how I met Raeann, New Hope’s Family Advocate.

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1st Summer Blog Post:

Shannon Follett: A Dedicated Therapist 

I’ve only been here at New Hope for six months, but if I had to pick one word to describe this organization, I would have to say “dedicated.” Without a doubt. New Hope is a place that tries to support children and families who have gone through trauma without re-traumatizing them again. It’s a very difficult, taxing job. But every minute is worth it.

To continue reading this amazing blog post please click the link below.

http://eepurl.com/b4jBPP

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